Hamilton COVID FAQ

HAMILTON COVID-19 HOTLINE
810-406-4019

How to Get an Appointment

Call 810.406.4019 for a COVID-19 testing appointment for both drive thru testing and in-clinic testing.

All patients must be seen by their medical provider before receiving a COVID-19 test at this time. If you are a Hamilton patient, please let the operator know you need an appointment for COVID-19. The operator will then transfer to you to a medical provider where he or she will evaluate your symptoms over the phone. If you can be treated over the phone, you will be. If you need to be evaluated in the clinic, an appointment will be set up.

(Call 810.406.4246 for a general medical, dental, therapy, vision appointments)

How to get a COVID-19 test at Hamilton

Call 810.406.4019 to set up an appointment for drive-thru testing or in-office clinic. Your doctor will need to provide you with an ‘order’ to get a COVID-19 test.

Do not come to the drive-thru testing area without a provider test-order and an appointment. Appointments will be scheduled every 10 minutes on Tuesdays and Thursdays for drive-thru testing. Tests can be conducted on other days inside the clinics.

TESTING & CARE GUIDELINES

When to Get Tested

Currently the recommendation to get tested is mild symptoms of:

  • Fever over 100 degrees
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

When to Seek Emergency Care

Seek Emergency Medical Attention if you develop any emergency warning signs, such as:

  • Trouble Breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • Confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

(This is not an all inconclusive list, if you feel you need assistance, call 911 or your medical provider immediately.)

When you call let the operator know you are or may be infected with COVID-19. If possible put a face mask on before Emergency personnel arrive.

Treatment at Home*

A sick person should:

Stay in one room, away from other people as much as possible.

  • If possible, use a separate bathroom from others in the home
  • Do not share personal household items, like dishes, towels, and bedding
  • Wear a cloth face covering (that covers nose and mouth) when around people
    • If the sick person can’t wear a cloth face covering, your caretaker should wear one while in the same room with them.
  • If you need to be around others, (within the home, in a vehicle, or doctor’s office), wear a cloth face covering that covers mouth and nose
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes; dispose of used tissues immediately
  • Wash your hands often
  • Do not touch others
  • Do not touch surfaces

Provide symptom treatment

  • Wear a facemask when interacting with the sick person
  • Make sure the sick person drinks a lot of fluids to stay hydrated and rests at home.
  • Over-the-counter medicines may help with symptoms.
  • For most people, symptoms last a few days and get better after a week.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after interacting with the sick person. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Every day, clean all surfaces that are touched often, like counters, tabletops, and doorknobs, light switches, cupboard handles or knobs
  • Use household cleaning sprays or wipes according to the label instructions.
  • Wash laundry thoroughly
    • Avoid shaking the sick person’s laundry
    • Wash your hands after handling dirty laundry
    • If laundry is soiled, wear disposable gloves and keep the soiled items away from your body while laundering. Wash your hands immediately after removing gloves.
  • Avoid having visitors.

For any additional questions about their care, contact their healthcare provider or state or local health department.

When to end home isolation (staying home)

People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (are home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:

  • If they will not have a test to determine if they are still contagious, they can leave home after these three things have happened:
    1. They have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers) AND
    2. other symptoms have improved (for example, when their cough or shortness of breath have improved) AND
    3. at least 7 days have passed since their symptoms first appeared
  • If they will be tested to determine if they are still contagious, they can leave home after these three things have happened:
    1. They no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers) AND
    2. other symptoms have improved (for example, when their cough or shortness of breath have improved) AND
    3. They received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Their doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

*In accordance to the CDC

Protect yourself from getting COVID-19

  • Avoid exposure to people who have the virus
  • Wear a facemask when in public and with other people
  • Wash your hands frequently
    • Wash for 20 seconds with soap and rinse for 10 seconds
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid contact with other people
    • Staying home away from people is the safest way to stay healthy and avoid getting the virus.
    • Keep at least 6 feet away from other people
    • Don’t visit other people or have visitors come to you
  • Cover your sneezes and coughs
    • Wash your hands after you sneeze or cough
    • Throw away any tissues
  • Clean and Disinfect your home frequently
    • Clean your home with a basic disinfectant, if you can’t find any at the store a solution of 10 % bleach to 90% water works also. Hydrogen Peroxide and ammonium/ammonia also work – just be sure to follow the label directions.
    • Frequently wipe down countertops, tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

Are You At Risk for COVID-19

Everyone is susceptible of catching the COVID-19 VIRUS. However, some people will have a harder time getting over the virus due to their underlying conditions and how their body responds to the virus.

Based on what we currently know now, people who are at a high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 have 1 or more of the following :

  • 65 years and older
  • underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, including:
    • chronic lung disease
    • moderate to severe asthma
    • heart conditions
    • immunocompromised - Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications
    • diabetes
    • chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis
    • liver disease
    • severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 40 or higher)
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